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Item #: ANCE00200
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: An inguinal hernia is a condition where abdominal contents, such as the intestine, bulge through a weakness in an area of the groin called the inguinal canal. As the intestine pushes through this weakness, a hernia sac made from tissue lining the inside of the abdomen, called the peritoneum, surrounds it. The intestine may become trapped, or incarcerated, inside the hernia sac. Over time, its blood supply may be cut off-- leading to strangulation-- where the tissue inside the hernia sac dies. A totally extra peritoneal laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair requires only small keyhole incisions into the abdomen, known as ports. To reach the hernia, the surgeon will insert a tube, called a trocar, through a port located just below your navel, or umbilicus. This instrument will be used to separate the inner abdominal wall from the peritoneum. Then, a balloon surrounding the instrument will be inflated to create a space for the surgeon to work. Next, your surgeon will insert the laparoscope through the umbilical port. Images from its camera will be transmitted to a video monitor in the operating room. Once the working space is created, two additional trocars will be inserted. The surgeon will pass surgical instruments through them. These instruments will be used to separate attachments to the hernia sac, and gently pull it out of the inguinal canal and back into the abdomen. To prevent anything from slipping back through the opening, the surgeon will place a piece of mesh over it and tack it in place. The incisions will be closed with sutures, followed by skin glue, or skin closure tape. [? If ?] there are complications with your laparoscopic procedure, your surgeon will switch to an open procedure with a larger incision.
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Item #: ANCE00200 — Source #: 1029
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