Quantcast

Search Content Library



Search Language
Browse
Medical Illustrations
Medical Charts
Tear Sheet Pads
Medical Animations
Medical Animation Titles
Medical Encyclopedia
Custom Interactive
Most Recent Uploads
Body Systems/Regions
Anatomy & Physiology
Cells & Tissues
Cardiovascular System
Digestive System
Lymphatic System
Integumentary System
Muscular System
Nervous System
Reproductive System
Respiratory System
Skeletal System
Special Senses
Urinary System
Abdomen
Back and Spine
Foot and Ankle
Head and Neck
Hip
Knee
Shoulder
Thorax
Medical Specialties
Cancer
Cardiology
Dentistry
Editorial
Health & Fitness
Neurology/Neurosurgery
Ob/Gyn
Orthopedics
Pathology
Pediatrics
Account
Administrator Login
Removal of Foley Catheter (Male) - Medical Animation
 
If animation does not play, download and install the latest free Flash Player plugin.
More Like ThisAdd To Lightbox AND12005 Elite  Enlarge Share
Animation licenses start at $350/year

Item #AND12005Source #1029

Removal of Foley Catheter (Male) - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: Please watch this entire video before removing your catheter. This video will teach you how to empty your Foley bag and remove your Foley catheter. A Foley catheter is a thin rubber tube that runs from your bladder to a Foley bag that collects urine. A balloon filled with water holds the catheter in place. A syringe removes water from the balloon through the balloon port. Removing your Foley catheter involves emptying your Foley bag, deflating the balloon, and removing your catheter. You will need disposable gloves, a syringe for removing the water from the balloon, and a clean cloth or paper towels to clean up spills. Be sure to keep the Foley bag lower than your hips to allow the urine to drain out of your bladder and into the bag. Step one. Wash your hands with soap and water and then dry them. Step two. Hold the bottom of the Foley bag over a toilet. Step three. Open the drain valve. Urine will begin draining from the bag. Empty the urine from the bag. Step four. Close the valve. Now you will begin removing the catheter. Step five. Wash your hands with soap and water again and then dry them. Step six. Put on disposable gloves. Step seven. Unclip the catheter from your leg. Step eight. Hold the balloon port tubing in one hand. Firmly push the end of the syringe into the balloon port and twist until you make a tight connection. Water from the balloon begins filling the syringe. Step nine. When the balloon is empty, relax, take a deep breath, and gently pull on the catheter to remove it. Do not pull hard. If gentle pulling does not remove the catheter, contact your health care provider. After you remove the catheter, drink plenty of water to create the urge to urinate and ease burning when passing urine. Contact your surgeon if you have any questions about your Foley catheter, your temperature is 101 degrees Fahrenheit or higher, your bladder feels full, but you see no urine draining into the Foley bag, you cannot remove your catheter with gentle pulling, your urine is cloudy, has a foul odor, or you see a lot of blood in your urine. It is normal to see a small amount of blood in your urine after removing a Foley catheter. Also contact your surgeon if you cannot urinate within eight hours after removing the Foley catheter, you feel burning or pain when urinating that lasts longer than 24 hours, your stomach feels bloated or painful, you feel the need to urinate more often than normal, or your bladder doesn't feel empty after urinating.

YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO REVIEW THESE ITEMS:
Surgical Repair of the Diaphragm
Surgical Repair of the Diaphragm - exh6019b
Medical Chart
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Lumbar Disc Herniation with Subsequent Hemilaminectomy and Discectomy Procedures
Lumbar Disc Herniation with Subsequent Hemilaminectomy and Discectomy Procedures - exh38659
Medical Chart
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Total Body Burn Injuries with Multiple Surgical Repairs
Total Body Burn Injuries with Multiple Surgical Repairs - exh48777b
Medical Chart
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Shoulder Dystocia with Resulting Brachial Plexus Injury Right
Shoulder Dystocia with Resulting Brachial Plexus Injury Right - exh62176
Medical Chart
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Thoracic Compression Fracture with Posterior Spinal Fusion
Thoracic Compression Fracture with Posterior Spinal Fusion - exh71549
Medical Chart
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Spinal Cord Injury
Spinal Cord Injury - exh81198b
Medical Chart
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
This exhibit is available in these languages:
Nucleus | About Nucleus | Medical Review Board | Free Medical Images | Testimonials | Patient Education
Social Media Marketing Hospital | Pregnancy Videos | Credits | Contact Us | Find a Lawyer | Hospital Marketing