Quantcast

Search Content Library



Search Language
Browse
Medical Illustrations
Medical Charts
Tear Sheet Pads
Medical Animations
Medical Animation Titles
Medical Encyclopedia
Custom Interactive
Most Recent Uploads
Body Systems/Regions
Anatomy & Physiology
Cells & Tissues
Cardiovascular System
Digestive System
Lymphatic System
Integumentary System
Muscular System
Nervous System
Reproductive System
Respiratory System
Skeletal System
Special Senses
Urinary System
Abdomen
Back and Spine
Foot and Ankle
Head and Neck
Hip
Knee
Shoulder
Thorax
Medical Specialties
Cancer
Cardiology
Dentistry
Editorial
Health & Fitness
Neurology/Neurosurgery
Ob/Gyn
Orthopedics
Pathology
Pediatrics
Account
Administrator Login
Osteoporosis - Medical Animation
 
If animation does not play, download and install the latest free Flash Player plugin.
More Like ThisAdd To Lightbox ANM11039 Elite  Enlarge Share
Animation licenses start at $350/year

Item #ANM11039Source #1029

Osteoporosis - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT:
Bone consists of a dense, compact layer and a spongy cancellous structure. While compact bone forms an organized outer shell, cancellous bone consists of thin, interlocking plates, called trabeculae. Osteoblasts and osteoclasts are the osteocytes, or bone cells, that make up bone tissue. Bone continually renews its structure and strength through remodeling. Osteoclasts break down existing bone, and osteoblasts built up new bone. In normal bone, adequate physical stress and changing blood calcium levels prompt osteocytes to initiate bone remodeling. Osteoblasts emit a cytokine that transforms immature osteoclasts into mature osteoclasts. In a process called resorption, mature osteoclasts use enzymes to remove existing bone tissue. Then osteoclasts release chemicals that stimulate immature osteoblasts to mature and release osteoprotegerin, a protein that deactivates osteoclasts, stopping bone resorption. In response, bone formation occurs. Mature osteoblasts deposit osteoid, a matrix that contains minerals, such as calcium and phosphorous, and a strong, flexible protein called collagen. Calcium and phosphorus crystallize or mineralize the osteoid, then transform into sturdy hydroxyapatite crystals, completing the bone formation process. In both men and women, before mid-life, bone resorption and bone formation are balanced. Hormones and other factors influence bone remodeling. For example, estrogen hormone suppresses osteoclasts, inhibiting resorption to help maintain bone strength. After mid-life, estrogen levels fall, and osteoclast activity may go unchecked. Increased resorption can lead to bone loss. Osteoporosis is a progressive disease in which the rate of bone resorption exceeds bone formation. As a result, the trabeculae in cancellous bone become fewer and farther apart. The compact bone thins, and overall, the bone becomes weak, fragile, and prone to fractures. Treatments for osteoporosis include calcium and vitamin D supplements to help maintain blood calcium levels, anti-resorptive medications that promote bone strength by preventing osteoclast activation and excessive resorption, anabolic medications, which increase osteoblast activity and promote bone formation, and exercise, including weight-bearing activities, which adds stress to bone, promoting remodeling. ♪ [music] ♪

YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO REVIEW THESE ITEMS:
Steroid Induced Osteoporosis with Increased Spinal Pathology Including Microfractures, Collapse and Degeneration
Steroid Induced Osteoporosis with Increased Spinal Pathology Including Microfractures, Collapse and Degeneration - exh5824
Medical Chart
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Arthritis
Arthritis - si1546
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Kyphosis
Kyphosis - si55551392
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Proper vs. Improper Shoulder Replacement
Proper vs. Improper Shoulder Replacement - exh37201
Medical Chart
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Tibial Fracture Fixation
Tibial Fracture Fixation - exh49286
Medical Chart
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Scoliosis
Scoliosis - ANH15155
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Nucleus | About Nucleus | Medical Review Board | Free Medical Images | Testimonials | Patient Education
Social Media Marketing Hospital | Pregnancy Videos | Credits | Contact Us | Find a Lawyer | Hospital Marketing